PIC
http://webdam.inria.fr/

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Web Data Management
 
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Serge Abiteboul Ioana Manolescu
INRIA Saclay & ENS Cachan INRIA Saclay & Paris-Sud University
Philippe Rigaux
CNAM Paris & INRIA Saclay
Marie-Christine Rousset Pierre Senellart
Grenoble University Tlcom ParisTech

Copyright @2011 by Serge Abiteboul, Ioana Manolescu, Philippe Rigaux, Marie-Christine Rousset, Pierre Senellart;
to be published by Cambridge University Press 2011. For personal use only, not for distribution.

http://webdam.inria.fr/Jorge/

Contents

  Introduction
I  Modeling Web Data
1  Data Model
2  XPath and XQuery
3  Typing
4  XML Query Evaluation
5  Putting into Practice: Managing an XML Database with EXIST
6  Putting into Practice: Tree Pattern Evaluation using SAX
II  Web Data Semantics and Integration
7  Ontologies, RDF, and OWL
8  Querying Data through Ontologies
9  Data Integration
10  Putting into Practice: Wrappers and Data Extraction with XSLT
11  Putting into Practice: Ontologies in Practice (by Fabian M. Suchanek)
12  Putting into Practice: Mashups with YAHOO! PIPES and XProc
III  Building Web Scale Applications
13  Web search
14  An Introduction to Distributed Systems
15  Distributed Access Structures
16  Distributed Computing with MAPREDUCE and PIG
17  Putting into Practice: Full-Text Indexing with LUCENE (by Nicolas Travers)
18  Putting into Practice: Recommendation Methodologies (by Alban Galland)
19  Putting into Practice: Large-Scale Data Management with HADOOP
20  Putting into Practice: COUCHDB, a JSON Semi-Structured Database

  References

A tree’s a tree. How many more do you need to look at? (Ronald Reagan)

The impious maintain that nonsense is normal in the Library, and that the reasonable (and even humble and pure coherence) is an almost miraculous exception. (The Library of Babel, Jorge Luis Borges)

“And is a library, then, an instrument not for distributing the truth but for delaying its appearance?” I asked, dumbfounded. “Not always and not necessarily. In this case it is.” (The Name of The Rose, Umberto Eco)

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